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1. The Clock is certainly dumb: a 24-hour movie made entirely from other movies in which the depicted screen time corresponds precisely to the actual time of the

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screening with plenty of clock inserts and shots in which clocks appear, sometimes incidentally. I’m sure I’m not the first to ask, why didn’t I think of that?

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But is The Clock dumb enough?

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2. The museum treated this second screening in its large theatre as an event, and it was an event. The museum had to justify its investment in a copy of The Clock.

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The announced purchase price of $475,000 seems both absurd and appropriate. The screening was scheduled to begin at 5:00 pm on July 28. 

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Admission was free, and there were no reservations. I expected a big crowd for the beginning so we arrived early. There was a line of people waiting by 4:00 pm, 

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but when they let people into the theatre around 4:30 pm, there were plenty of seats. The movie was already playing so that there was no beginning.

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the theatre was packed, and there was a long line of people outside waiting to get in. I managed to talk my way back in without having to wait in line,

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There was a small exodus around 5:45 pm, but then the theatre started filling up. By 8:05 pm, when I went out to get a light dinner in the museum cafeteria, 

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but when I went out again at 10:15 pm to meet my wife, who was returning for the midnight segment, I got in line. We waited from 10:20 pm to 11:20 pm to get back in.

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I discovered that waiting in line was more fun than watching the movie. [...]


CONTINUE READING “RANDOM NOTES ON A PROJECTION OF THE CLOCK BY CHRISTIAN MARCLAY AT THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART, 4:32 PM, JULY 28, 2011–5:02 PM, JULY 29, 2011” BY THOM ANDERSEN